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Article #1 Mad Scientist Muscle Sample Program
Article #2 Training on the Edge - Learn How Overtraining on Purpose Can Get You Maximum Results FAST!
Article #3 Why You Need to Do a LOW-Calorie Diet If You Want to Build Maximum Muscle

 

Article #1

Subject Lines:

FREE muscle-building program for you!
Check out this FREE muscle program (inside this email!)
3 day per week muscle program...yours FREE

Body:

If you want to build serious muscle, you need to use a program
designed to take advantage of how your body works and responds
to various forms of training.

That's where THIS cool little one-week program from "Mad
Scientist of Muscle" Nick Nilsson comes i
nto play.

It basically compresses the entire 8 week cycle of Nick's full
Mad Scientist Muscle training program into ONE week, which you
can then repeat for 4 to 6 weeks (or until you stop seeing results).

Mad Scientist Muscle training is all about pushing your body to the
limits in a systemic, targeted (and just a bit insane!) fashion
where each workout sets up the next and builds on the last
for MAJOR results.

Mad Scientist Mucle

(http://hop.clickbank.net/?XXXXX/betteru&l=900)

This three day per week (M/W/F) program is based on the
three phases of the original program....


1. Structural Training: designed to alter the physiology of
your body through very high-reps (to increase the capillarization
of the muscle tissue) and very heavy partial-range training (to
strengthen the connective tissue and nervous system).

2. Accumulation: a strategic increase in training volume to
overload the body and force adaptation. This is where you'll
see an increase in muscle mass.

3. Intensification: a pullback on training volume and an
increase in intensity to allow the body to rebound from the
previous training. This is where you'll see the increase in
your strength.


In this 3 day program, the first day is Structural Training, which
will prepare your body to be better able to build muscle tissue
and support it. The second day is volume...lots of sets with
moderate weight and very little rest. The third is intensity...
heavy weight and longer rest.

Each workout will be a total-body session, focusing only on
the big muscles and big exercises to stimulate maximum
gains. The smaller muscles will get ample stimulation and
do not need to be worked directly.

Perform this program for 4 to 6 weeks, mixing up the
exercises you're using regularly and purposefully increasing
the weights you're using whenever you can do so while
keeping good form.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Workouts

Day 1 (Monday) - Structural Training

For the sets of 100 reps, choose a very light weight and get
as many reps as you can. If you don't hit 100 reps, stop then
take 10 seconds rest and get as many reps as you can.
Repeat until you get to 100 total reps. Follow this pattern on
the second set as well. Take 2 minutes rest between sets.

Back - 2 sets of 100 reps - seated cable rows or pulldowns
Chest - 2 sets of 100 reps - barbell or dumbell bench press
Thighs - 2 sets of 100 reps - leg press, barbell squats or dumbell squats

For the partial-range sets, work only the top few inches of
the range of motion and hold the lockout position for at
least 5 seconds on each rep to load the connective tissue.
You can use weights 20 to 50% higher than your 1 RM for
these sets. Take 2 minutes rest between sets.

Back - 3 sets of 6 to 8 reps - rack pulls or top-range chin-ups or rows
Chest - 3 sets of 6 to 8 reps - top-range barbell bench press
(http://hop.clickbank.net/?XXXXX/betteru&l=1123)
Thighs - 3 sets of 6 to 8 reps - top-range squats or leg press
(http://hop.clickbank.net/?XXXXX/betteru&l=3004)


Day 2 (Wednesday) - Accumulation Training

This will be Time-Volume Training, which is Nick's version of
density training. Take a weight you can get 10 reps with and
do sets of 3 reps with it (you will staying with that same
weight through the entire work period). Take 10 seconds
rest between sets. When you can no longer get 3 reps on a
set, start taking 20 seconds rest. Then 30 seconds, then 40,
etc. You will be working one exercise for a specific block
of time, doing as many sets of that exercise within that time
block as you can, increasing your rest periods instead of
changing weights.

For more detailed information on Time-Volume Training, click here.
(http://hop.clickbank.net/?XXXXX/betteru&l=4004)

This training is designed to hit your body with massive
workload without going near failure and taxing the nervous
system.

Back - 15 minutes - chin-ups, pulldowns, rows, or deadlifts
Chest - 15 minutes - barbell or dumbell bench press
Thighs - 15 minutes - barbell squats, front squats, split squats or leg press


Day 3 (Friday) - Intensification Training

This day of training is all about strength. You'll be doing
low-rep sets with longer rest periods to maximize power
and recovery. You'll be using a 5-3-1 rep scheme where
your first set will be done for 5 reps, your second set for
3 reps and your final set for 1 rep, increasing the weight
you use on each set. Your final set should NOT be a true
1 rep max...aim for around 95 to 98% 1RM.

In addition to pulling back on volume and allowing for
recovery, you're teaching your nervous system how to
handle near-limit weights with good form. Take 2 to 3
minutes rest in between sets.

Back - 3 sets (5-3-1-) - deadlifts, weighted-chin-ups or rows
Chest - 3 sets (5-3-1-) - barbell or dumbell bench press
Thighs - 3 sets (5-3-1) - barbell squats, front squats or leg press

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

This "single-week-cycle" style of program is what is known
as "microperiodization" where you don't go with longer,
weeks-long cycles of each, but instead do very short cycles
compressed into a much smaller timeframe.

It's a similar idea to training the body more frequently
with fewer sets rather than doing single-bodypart training
where you beat your body down then give it a week to recover.

By not making as big of inroads into your body's recovery
abilities, you give your body a better shot at growing.

If you decide to give this program a try, let me know how you
like it. Because it's a one-week cycle, you can just commit to
it for a few weeks to give it a test drive and see how it goes.

It'll also give you a good taste of what the full Mad Scientist
Muscle program
is all about (it expands this one-week cycle
into an 8 week cycle...it also includes 3 different versions of
the program, giving you a total of 6 months of muscle-building
programming all laid out for you).

http://hop.clickbank.net/?XXXXX/betteru&l=900

It's an excellent program and definitely worth checking out.

[SIGN OFF]

P.S. If you're interested in more detailed information about this
type of training and learning how you can use specific training
methods to literally CHANGE your body's physiology to better
support muscle growth, you can grab a FREE copy of Nick's
report "2 Simple Rules to DOUBLE Your Muscle-Building Results" here:

http://hop.clickbank.net/?XXXXX/betteru&l=901

 

Article #2

Subject Lines:

You've got to overtrain on PURPOSE if you want to build muscle...
Want muscle? Then you've gotta OVERTRAIN on purpose...

Body:

[you can write your own short intro in your own voice here or use this sample intro]

So today, I've got an eye-opening article from my friend and
colleague Nick Nilsson (a.k.a. The Mad Scientist of Muscle)
talking about why you actually NEED to use overtraining if
you want to build muscle over the long-term.

This is excellent info..it'll really teach you how the body works
and how you use overtraining to your advantage to build muscle
and strength fast!

---

Training on the Edge - Learn How Overtraining
on Purpose Can Get You Maximum Results FAST!

By Nick Nilsson
Author of Mad Scientist Muscle
http://hop.clickbank.net/?XXXXX/betteru&l=900


We've always been told that it's bad to overtrain. Guess what?
Overtraining on purpose is where the REAL results are.

But first, what is overtraining? Overtraining is, most simply,
training too much. Your body is unable to recover from the
volume or frequency of training and begins to break down.
You not only lose motivation to train, you become more
susceptible to injury and illness, and you may even start
to go backwards in your training, getting smaller and
weaker on almost a daily basis.

So how can overtraining possibly be good for you?
I'll tell you.

It all begins with the incredible adaptive power of your
body. As you become more advanced in weight training,
you will generally notice that you cannot make consistent
gains for a long period of time on one training system.
Your body quickly adapts to whatever training system
you're using and hits a plateau. To get around this, it's
usually recommended that you change your program
every three to six weeks.

The question now is how to use this adaptive
ability to your advantage.

It's really quite simple. You gradually build up to a
state of temporary overtraining, then, when you're
overtrained and your adaptive processes are working
to their fullest capacity for recovery, you back off. This
backing off results in what is called overcompensation.

Imagine you're driving a car and climbing a hill with
the gas pedal to the floor. You're giving it everything
you've got but you're still going up slowly. This is
similar to overtraining. When you reach the top, the
going gets a lot easier. If you keep the gas pedal on the
floor when you go over the top and head down, you're
going to go a lot faster very quickly. This is
overcompensation and this is where the results are.

On a normal program, you work a bodypart, it becomes
temporarily weaker, then becomes stronger as it
overcompensates so you can lift more next time. What
a normal program does on a small, local basis, this
overtraining program does on a full body, systemic basis.

Sound good? We're not done. Now we're going to
harness the power of overtraining by using what I call
"Controlled Overtraining." This style of training is also
known as "Accumulation and Intensification."

The overtraining or ramping phase of this Controlled
Overtraining style of program lasts three weeks, which
is about the time it takes the body to adapt to a training
program. It then backs off to a relatively easy phase for
three weeks.

I'll give you an example of this type of propram with
some numbers so you can see exactly how it works.

Let's say you start out doing 3 sets for each bodypart
the first week. You'll then do 4 sets the second week,
and 5 sets the third week. While you're increasing the
volume (number of sets), you're simultaneously
decreasing the rest period. For example, week 1, you'll
use 90 seconds rest. Week 2, you'll use 60 seconds rest.
Week 3 you'll use 45 seconds rest.

This gradually builds you up to overtraining and
THAT is where we back off.

For the next three weeks, you then decrease the sets
and reps and increase the rest periods. This allows you
to recover from the overtraining and take advantage of
the overcompensation that occurs when the body is still
working at dealing with the hard work and then you cut
the hard work. Though it may feel like you're hardly
doing anything at all, you should see some great results.

For example, you'll reduce the number of sets back down
to three per bodypart and increase rest periods to two
minutes. During this phase, you could also decrease your
rep ranges so you're using heavier weight and focusing
more on strength. You can see some BIG TIME results
during this phase!

Continue this lower-volume training for at least three
weeks. If, at the end of those three weeks, you are still
making progress, keep going! Don't cut yourself off from
any results. This phase could last as long as 6 weeks or
more. When you start to slow down, however, it's time to
ramp back up to overtraining. Keeping up this cycling of
volume and intensity is a strategy that gives consistent
results over long periods of time.

As you can see, overtraining is not always the horrible
thing it's often made out to be. Training on the edge is
where the real results are. Those who shy away from it will
never make as good of progress as those who embrace it!

This type of "Controlled Overtraining" is an integral part of
my Mad Scientist Muscle program.

http://hop.clickbank.net/?XXXXX/betteru&l=900

During each unique cycle of the program, I take you
through 3 weeks of ramping up...accumulation...using a
different volume-based training style.

After that, you'll go directly into a lower-volume, higher-
intensity style of training paired specifically with the
training style you just finished to deliver maximum gains
and taking full advantage of the increased "revvs" your
body is experiencing in metabolism.

This program delivers BIG results in a "controlled overtraining"
framework.

---

Hope you've enjoyed the info! [you can add your own comments about the article here, if you like]

[SIGN OFF]

P.S. If you're interested in more detailed information about
this type of training and learning how you can use specific
training methods to literally CHANGE your body's physiology
to better support muscle growth, you can grab a FREE copy
of Nick's report "2 Simple Rules to DOUBLE Your Muscle-Building
Results" here:

http://hop.clickbank.net/?XXXXX/betteru&l=901

 

Article #3

Subject Lines:

Is eating TOO much killing your muscle growth?
Want to build muscle? Go on a diet...(say what?)
Eat less to build muscle...(what?)
Eat LESS to build muscle...(here's why)
How to build muscle by eatnig a low-calorie diet...
Want muscle? You're eating TOO much...

Body:

[you can write your own short intro in your own voice here or use this sample intro]

So today, I've got a controversial article from my friend and
colleague Nick Nilsson (a.k.a. The Mad Scientist of Muscle).

If you've ever hit a plateau with muscle building (who hasn't!),
this could be just the information you need to blast through it.

You're going to learn why you actually NEED to go on a low-
calorie diet if you want to build muscle fast! Sounds crazy, but
have a read through and see what you think.

---

Why You Need to Do a LOW-Calorie Diet If You
Want to Build Maximum Muscle

By Nick Nilsson

This is going to sound strange but when you're trying to build
muscle, I HIGHLY recommend doing a strategic low-calorie
diet on a regular basis.

Why low-calorie dieting for MUSCLE?

There are several reasons...

---

1. Appetite

First, I've found that eating large amounts of food for long
stretches of time tends to diminish your enthusiasm for eating
large amounts of food for long stretches of time.

When your appetite drops, you're not going to be able to
eat as much without forcing yourself to, and therefore, your
overall calorie intake can potentially be diminished. I can
tell you from experience, if you eat a LOT all the time, you
do get tired of eating. This is a way to fix it and hit the "reset"
button on your appetite, which is going to pay off when you
go back to eating more again.


2. Digestive System Overload

The digestive system can be overworked if you demand too
much of it with no break. By constantly hammering the
digestive tract with piles of food, you're basically grinding
down it's capacity to digest and absorb nutrients.

So even if you're eating a lot of food, you may not even be
getting the nutrition you THOUGHT you were out of it!


3. Rebound Weight Gain

Strategic periods of low-calorie eating sets up a rebound effect
when you go back to higher-calorie eating. Basically, by taking
a few days easy and not eating much, you're going to be
creating momentum for when you go back to eating more again.

Think of the yo-yo diet thing, only with exercise. A short diet
will give you the benefits of rebound weight gain without the
detrimental effects of long-term low-calories eating and muscle
loss.


4. Insulin Sensitivity

By managing insulin levels (via low-glycemic or low-carb
dieting), you can help help improve insulin sensitivity. Insulin
is a powerful anabolic hormone...in fact, it's CRITICAL for
building muscle because it signals the muscle cells to take in
nutrients and unlocks the cellular "doors" to let nutrients in
(like a bouncer at a bar).

Here's the thing...if insulin levels are too high for too long,
your body develops resistance to insulin, which is a potential
problem with long-term heavy eating of carbs, typical of a
weight-gain diet. By backing off on food and carbs for a few
days, you give your body a chance to restore some insulin
sensitivity.


5. Keeping Bodyfat in Check While Building Muscle

One of the biggest problems people encounter with weight
gain diets is gaining weight. I'll be more specific...gaining
FAT. Few people train hard to get fatter (nobody I know!).
This type of staggered-calorie eating is an excellent way to
keep bodyfat from climbing too high on a muscle-building,
higher-calorie diet.

It gives you the majority of your days in a surplus-calorie
state with just a few days in a negative-calorie state. Those
negative calorie days can have a big impact on minimizing
fat gain. I can't say you won't gain ANY fat...that'll depend
on other factors. But it's going to give you a much better
shot at keeping bodyfat from climbing too high.

---

How to Do It

I'll give you an example from myself. From my Mad Scientist
Muscle program.

http://hop.clickbank.net/?XXXXX/betteru&l=900

In that program, I include weekend dieting...2 days of low-
carb eating in this case. So basically, it's 5 days of high-calorie
eating then 2 days of low-calorie eating.

I don't do any training on the low-calorie days, which
minimizes any chance of muscle breakdown. As I mentioned,
it's low-carb so insulin levels are basically zero.

This sets up a nice rebound effect both from insulin and
from increase calorie load the following week (if you don't
want to do low-carb, you don't have to...low-calorie eating
in general will give you great benefits as well).

I've noticed a SIGNIFICANT difference in how well this
strategy works, as compared to straight-through higher-
calorie eating. I actually find I build muscle and gain weight
EASIER when I do two days of low-calorie eating every
week because of this rebound effect.

Plus, I keep bodyfat levels lower, which is great. To give
you an idea, in the past 5 months, I've gone from 188 lbs
in bodyweight to 217 lbs in bodyweight. I'm not shredded
by any stretch, but I can still see a decent six-pack...which
is not bad for having gained almost 30 pounds in 5 months!

It's definitely something I would recommend you give a
try, especially if you're keen on increasing muscle mass
while keeping bodyfat in check.

The base nutritional strategy of Mad Scientist is all about
cycling of calories. It really provides a nice alternative to
constant high-calorie loads on the body while actually
delivering even BETTER results than you could achieve
with high-calories alone!

You can read more about Mad Scientist Muscle here...

http://hop.clickbank.net/?XXXXX/betteru&l=900

---

Hope you enjoyed the info! [you can write some of your own comments about the article here to personalize]

[sign off]

P.S. If you're interested in more detailed information about this
type of eating strategy and learning how you can use specific
training methods to literally CHANGE your body's physiology to
better support muscle growth, you can grab a FREE copy of Nick's
report "2 Simple Rules to DOUBLE Your Muscle-Building Results" here:

http://hop.clickbank.net/?XXXXX/betteru&l=901

 

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